How to Monitor Multiple Social Media Metrics

 

  • August 8, 2016

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social media toolsDo you manage multiple social media profiles for your business?

Looking for an easier way to keep an eye on key social media metrics?

Setting up a customized dashboard lets you monitor and report on the performance of your social media platforms in one convenient place.

In this article, you’ll discover how to set up a dashboard to track key social media metrics for your business.

social media metric dashboard tools and set up

Discover how to use a dashboard to monitor multiple social media metrics.

#1: Choose a Dashboard Tool

There are a number of dashboard tools available. To select the right one for your business, you’ll want to consider cost, make sure the tool integrates with the platforms you use, and explore the interface for ease of use.

Here are four for you to consider:

Dasheroo

Dasheroo lets you create customized dashboards to view everything from Facebook and Twitter to Google Analytics and your email marketing metrics, all in one place. It integrates with more than 27 applications like Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, PayPal, SurveyMonkey, Google Analytics, and more.

dasheroo

Dasheroo connects you to your data, whether you’re a solopreneur or a large team.

If you’re on a large marketing team, your group can access the same dashboards and add comments and notes on different metrics you’re viewing. It’s a great way to improve team collaboration.

dasheroo

Collaborate with team members using comments on the data.

With Dasheroo’s free plan, you can monitor up to 12 metrics (also known as insights). One of the cool things about Dasheroo is the ability to monitor individual insights. You can also use any of the tool’s popular templates or data mashups to compare channels.

If you want more dashboards and insights, upgrade to a paid plan starting at $19 per month.

Cyfe

Cyfe goes beyond social media to connect all of your marketing channels in one robust platform. Cyfe lets you use pre-built widgets for advertising, blogging, email, social media, SEO, and more. It natively integrates with 68 applications.

cyfe

Cyfe connects with dozens of applications to give you a well-rounded view of your data.

Cyfe’s free plan includes up to five widgets. It’s perfect for individuals or small businesses that need to track only basic analytics. There’s also a premium version that gives you access to unlimited widgets starting at $19 per month.

Klipfolio

With Klipfolio you get real-time access to your business metrics and analytics and can connect to all of the services you use every day. Starting at $24 per month for up to five users, it’s a great option for small- to medium-sized businesses.

klipfolio

Klipfolio allows you to access more advanced data sources.

Raven Tools

A great option for small- to medium-sized businesses, Raven Tools lets teams collaborate seamlessly on SEO, social, PPC, and content marketing campaigns all in one place. Reporting is easy and automated. With prices starting at $99 per month, it’s an affordable and effective option for campaign managing and reporting.

raven tools

Raven Tools offers more than a dashboard; you’ll get SEO scores, problem areas, and more.

#2: Tie in Facebook Metrics

With Facebook, monitor your page impressions, fan count, new fans, and overall clicks, shares, likes, and comments. Also look at your average daily engagement rate and your most engaging posts.

Add these Facebook insights to your dashboard: overview, engagement rate, and highest engagement. Here’s an example of what your Facebook dashboard might look like:

facebook dashboard

Focus your Facebook dashboard on engagement to find out what content is working.

#3: Include Twitter Metrics

If you’re using Twitter, be sure to monitor your total number of followers, following, and tweets. Also track your average daily retweets, replies, mentions, and likes, and your most engaging tweets.

Add these Twitter insights to your dashboard: overview, engagement, and highest engagement. Here’s an example of what your Twitter dashboard might look like:

twitter dashboard

Look at the engagement level for your Twitter content using this type of dashboard.

#4: Set Up Pinterest Metrics

For Pinterest performance, you’ll want to monitor engagement rate by board, best-performing pins, and overall engagement rate. Also track total repins, likes, and comments, and the total number of followers, boards, pins, repins, likes, and comments.

Add these Pinterest insights to your dashboard: overview, engagement, engagement rate, best-performing pins, and engagement rate by board. Here’s an example of what your Pinterest dashboard might look like:

pinterest dashboard

Focus your Pinterest dashboard on the performance of your pins and boards.

#5: Connect Instagram Metrics

For Instagram performance, monitor your total number of followers, following, and posts. Also track your total number of likes and comments, most engaging grams, and (potentially) your most engaging hashtags.

Add these Instagram insights to your dashboard: overview, engagement, highest engagement, and hashtag leaderboard. Here’s an example of what your Instagram dashboard might look like:

instagram dashboard

Monitor the engagement of your Instagram content and your top hashtags.

#6: Incorporate LinkedIn Metrics

For LinkedIn performance, keep these metrics on your radar: your overall engagement rate, most engaging posts, and total likes, comments, shares, and clicks.

Add these LinkedIn insights to your dashboard: total followers, engagement, engagement rate, and updates with the highest engagement. Here’s an example of what your LinkedIn dashboard might look like:

linkedin dashboard

Keep tabs on the performance of your LinkedIn content with this dashboard.

#7: Integrate Google Analytics

With Google Analytics, keep an eye on your total sessions, top pages by sessions, top sources by medium, and top referrers. If you’re more advanced and have set up goals within Google Analytics, track goal performance as well.

Add these Google Analytics insights to your dashboard: total sessions, top sources by medium, top pages, all traffic, goals comparison, and goal performance. Here’s an example of what your Google Analytics dashboard might look like:

google analytics dashboard

Monitor the performance of all of your content by seeing how it’s impacting traffic to your website or blog.

#8: Integrate Email Marketing Metrics

If you’re measuring your email marketing performance, keep an eye on your email open and click rates, as well as the health of your email list(s).

Add these email marketing insights to your dashboard: engagement (last 30 emails), engagement by list, list health, and health by list. Here’s an example of what your email marketing dashboard might look like:

email dashboard

Get a quick look at your email performance to see what content is engaging your subscribers.

Conclusion

Dashboards come in many shapes and sizes, which makes them perfect for marketers under time pressure who need to manage multiple accounts. Plus, dashboards are a great way to keep a finger on the pulse of your marketing channels.

Whether you’re working alone or as part of a larger marketing team, dashboards help you get more done and improve your marketing efforts. It’s all about finding the right tool for the job.

Build a Data-Driven Content Strategy

Build a Data-Driven Content Strategy by Yourself, for Free, in 1 Day

Content-Marketing-Dan-McGaw-Cover
You can have a solid content strategy up and running in a day. OR, you could trade it all for what’s in this box.

Content marketing isn’t the next big thing. It’s here, it’s happening now, and if you aren’t using content to grow your audience, you’re losing them to competitors who are.

But building a content strategy is a ton of work, particularly if you’re a small team – perhaps even a team of one. Right?

Dan McGaw doesn’t think so. In his recent Unwebinar, The Facts & Fairytales of Conversion-Driven Content, he outlines a detailed framework for building a content strategy in little more than half an hour.

And he has the results to prove that it works: it’s the same strategy that he and his agency Effin Amazing employed to increase ChupaMobile’s organic traffic by 19%, and revenue by 38%.

It can be done by a single person in just one day, all with free tools from Google and a bit of research.

It all starts with finding out what people are already looking for.

Use Google Keyword Planner to assess demand for content

One of the “fairy tales of content marketing” that Dan described is that producing content is an art that is informed primarily by gut instinct. But as Dan put it:

If no one is looking for your content, no one will read the content you write.

So how do you write the kinds of content that your target audience is looking for?

Google’s Keyword Planner is a powerful go-to tool for pay-per-click marketers, who use it to measure search volume for specific keywords and plan their campaigns. But it’s not only useful for PPC. Dan explained that it can be used to learn what kinds of content your prospective audience is demanding in just a few simple steps:

  1. Enter keywords relating to your product and industry. This includes the names of competitors or types of services that might overlap with yours.
  2. Create a list of the highest-volume keywords. Google will let you know the monthly average searches for every term you search. Depending on how niche your subject matter is, what constitutes an acceptable level of traffic will vary, but Dan sets the threshold for content that people care about at 10,000 monthly searches minimum.These high-volume keywords form the core of your content direction, since it’s the type of content that your audience is likely to search for.
  3. Generate keyword ideas based on the highest-volume keywords. Take the list of high-volume keywords you created and enter them into the Keyword Planner under Search for new keywords using a phrase, website, or category. Google will use its omniscient cloudmind to discover related keywords and hand them back to you.

Working these keywords into your content will be critical for generating organic traffic. But the research doesn’t end here; the keywords are just the key.

Generate even more keywords with predictive search results

Now that you have your list of totally-targetable keywords, it’s time to check out the competitive landscape with some good old Googling. But make sure you’re using Incognito mode, or whatever your browser’s private browsing mode is called: Google personalizes search results based on your history, and you don’t want that interfering with your research.

You can then start performing searches of your keyword list, and you’ll realize something wonderful happens: Google will tell you exactly how people are phrasing their searches by displaying the most popular searches as recommendations.

dan-mcgaw

This is the information that will inform you on what specific subjects people are interested in. After all, “analytics” is just a keyword, but “how to add google analytics to WordPress” is nearly a fully-formed post idea.

Plus, knowing exactly what people are searching for will also let you know exactly what they find.

Content audit your competitors

This is one of the most time-consuming aspects of crafting your content strategy, but it’s also one of the most important. If you don’t know what your competitors are doing, how can you out-do them?

Dan suggests performing searches using your list of keywords and the recommended search phrases, and take note of what pieces of content appear on the first page of results. Then:

  • Read the three most recent articles on the first page. You’re likely to see articles that are anywhere from a few months to many years old. Focus on the most recent ones.
  • Write down three things that suck about each of them. And that doesn’t mean poor formatting or ugly images (though those are important to get right). This is not about being self-congratulatory, but about finding opportunities to capitalize on. If there’s some crucial fact or brilliant revelation missing from your competitors’ content, you want it to be in yours.
  • Then write down three ways your content piece could be better. This can be elaborating on a subject that your competitors glazed over, introducing a new bombshell piece of information, or experimenting with formatting in a way that makes content more engaging.

But you don’t have to stop here. By combining your keyword research with defined goals based on your audience’s needs, you can extrapolate your keyword research into even more content ideas.

Create new content ideas based on your keyword research

These are the tactics that Effin Amazing used when they took on client ChupaMobile, a marketplace for app templates that can be re-skinned and released as new apps. Ultimately, they formed four core blog topics addressing the wants and needs of their audience:

  • Hiring a mobile developer
  • How to launch a mobile app
  • How to make money from apps
  • Building apps with no code

And with the knowledge of both the highest volume keywords and the specific phrases used to search those keywords, they were able to create a series of blog post ideas addressing exactly the questions people were searching for.

Dan-McGaw-Blog-Post-Ideas

And you can do the same.

Combining all of the previous research you’ve done, you’ll now have both a clear list of both which existing pieces of content you need to compete with and what types of new content to create to attract your target audience.

Converting through content, via landing pages

Once you’re growing traffic through smart content production, what do you do with it? Is there a clear pathway from your content to conversion?

Dan recommends an approach we also use here at Unbounce: designating a specific piece of gated content (like an ebook) per post, building a landing page for each, and directing to those landing pages with various calls to action in each post, like at the end of the post or with an exit intent overlay.

Dan-McGaw-CTA

It’s not about exerting pressure, but about creating an opportunity. If you don’t ask, you cannot receive. Create great content, link to relevant “content upgrades” with dedicated landing pages, and nurture the leads you collect from said content. (You can learn more about the nurturing part in the full webinar.)